Get Organized For Sickness

Get Organized For Being Sick

I spent this past week with the worst bout of flu I’ve had in years – sweats, shivers, watering eyes, headaches, the works.

But I’ve made a pretty speedy recovery and I actually feel as though it’s done me some good – I feel rested and freshly motivated. And I think that’s largely because I was able to relax and recuperate. Which was possible thanks to a little organization.

If you want to make sure a dose of something nasty doesn’t wipe you out, use these tips to get organized for being sick.

1. Have basic supplies on hand

It’s smart to keep general cold and flu supplies in the bathroom cabinet, especially during the cold months.

I prefer to let nature take its course so I avoid antibiotics and fancy cold and flu formulations, but choose what’s right for you. And be sure to check the expiry date on all your medications.

I keep these in the bathroom cabinet at all times:

  • Vicks/menthol
  • Sore-throat lozenges/gargle
  • Lotion-infused tissues
  • Aspirin.

Make your own list and stock up so you’re prepared for those inevitable colds and flus.

2. Perform work/home triage

As soon as a nasty bug gets you, you need to perform task triage.

Work tasks

What do you need to take care of for the coming week? Look for important matters that need to be handled to avoid problems or stress later on.

If you can ask an assistant or colleague to help with these items, great. If not, do them yourself quickly. Even though you feel lousy, it will be worth the effort.

Work tasks that need to be dealt with before you can turn to getting well could include:

  • Rescheduling appointments
  • Creating an out-of-office email/voicemail message
  • Advising clients/managers of delayed project delivery
  • Postponing actions or tasks and letting relevant people know
  • Completing actions or tasks that can’t be postponed.

Home tasks

What do you need to take care of for the coming week? Here again, focus on pressing matters that need to be handled to avoid problems or stress later on.

If you can, ask a family member to help you out; if not, get through the essentials quickly so you can buy yourself recuperation time.

Home tasks that you need to address before you can turn to recovery could include:

  • Paying bills that are due (once you’re well, consider organizing your bill payment)
  • Rescheduling deliveries or appointments
  • Ordering essential supplies online
  • Asking neighbors to help with the kids’ pick-ups and drop-offs
  • Handling any school requirements – such as notices to be signed.

3. Take responsibility for your own rest and recuperation

If you have basic supplies on hand and you perform task triage as soon as you succumb to sickness, then you stand a good of chance of getting well quickly.

My philosophy is that just because you’re sick, you don’t have to be miserable. Unless you’re 7 and you have a doting parent at your beck and call, it’s unlikely anyone is going to be pampering you and helping you feel better. Sadly, in the adult world, that’s now your responsibility. Your body is down for the count – use the time to look after yourself.

Here are some of the things I comfort myself with when I’m sick:

  • Cozy, non-scratchy waffle blankets
  • Lotion-infused tissues
  • DVD box sets (unchallenging comedy series, or comforting English detective series like Miss Marple)
  • Garlic pizza (my local pizzeria delivers and adds extra garlic if I ask).

These are the things I use to maximize my rest and feel better fast. Your preferences will be different – do what works for you.

Whatever you do, though, don’t feel sorry for yourself – feel better!

[Image: by TheGiantVermin]

Michele | Get Organized Gal

Michele is into writing, books, simplicity, love, TV, productivity, and staying thin in a world of chocolate.

7 thoughts on “Get Organized For Sickness

  1. Jessica says:

    I basically already have a home pharmacy; no matter what part of my body hurts I have meds on hand to take care of it so i dont need to go out when i’m sick

  2. Amy says:

    I often freeze single portions of soup, like little insurance policies, thinking “This will be good if I get sick and am too sick to make soup!”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *